Contact Us

Thank you for reaching out to the Libertarian Party of Texas. We are highly responsive to comments on this page but if you wish to contact us another way here is our contact info.

111 Congress Ave Suite 400, Austin, Texas 78701

Toll-Free: (800) 422-1776

Phone: (512) 279-7860

Fax: (512) 233-0613


Showing 33 reactions

  • commented 2016-08-24 07:30:40 -0500
  • commented 2016-08-23 16:13:10 -0500
    I will be voting straight Libertarian, here in Corpus Christi. Could some one put a sign in my yard?


    Mike Malloy
  • commented 2016-08-23 12:34:32 -0500
    I am interested in becoming more involved in the work of the LP, and especially in bringing the candidacy of Gary Johnson to the attention of so many disaffected voters.
  • commented 2016-08-22 21:30:41 -0500
    I want to help send Gary Johnson and Bill Weld to the White House. I am new to your party but I want to get much more involved. I need to know where I can get info on Gary Jonhson and Bill Weld to canvass my neighborhood to let people know that there is another choise than R&D
  • commented 2016-08-21 08:15:35 -0500
    I could not reach Gerald Fowler, US House Of Representatives, 7th district in 2014—please forward this:


    Good luck with all your campaigns Gerald, and please contact me if you need help. If you give me an email address, I’d be glad to send my growing database of our over 1,600 candidates who are stepping forward—like you—to solve this latest problem with our great country. Maybe you good people could get to know each other. Also, joining https://www.facebook.com/groups/Libertarian.candidates “Libertarian candidates helping each other” should be enjoyable.


    10. 1¶4: What would be the price of a contract insurance policy?


    One percent of the value being insured. For example—in order to buy a house—if I sign a contract with a bank to repay one hundred thousand dollars over a thirty year period, I would pay our government one thousand dollars per year to insure the deal. If I continue to make the agreed upon payments, I could enjoy my house without interference from anyone. Multiplying these common transactions by the number of Americans, our government could earn billions of dollars.


    This is the revolutionary idea: “our government could EARN”—just like what every other law abiding citizen has been doing since governments were invented. Instead of politicians bribing one group to impose a tax on another and then using that money to buy votes for the next tax, politicians would be elevated to the honorable status of people who provide a valuable service, and work to satisfy their customers. This new job description probably would not appeal to those who enter government to gain power over people—a great byproduct of contract insurance.


    If the one percent premium was too low to operate our government, our politicians could either increase their efficiency or raise the price. If the price was too high, either the voters could elect politicians who would lower it or people would be free to operate without contract insurance. With this innovation, we finally could bring government into the civilized world, where people offer value for value. www.LP4.org
  • commented 2016-08-09 11:33:19 -0500
    Hello,


    I would like to know how to officially register as a libertarian party affiliate. I am having trouble finding resources about it.


    Thanks,
  • commented 2016-08-08 20:19:17 -0500
    I want to be more involved! County precinct chair or something…
  • commented 2016-08-06 16:46:17 -0500
    Little note as someone who is working on spreading Gary Johnson’s campaign in Texas. Using positive contrasts instead of negative contrasts is much more likely to gain new members, and under the Principles tab on the main page, each of the “Libertarina &” items uses negative contrast. This is going to drive people away instead of bringing people in. Showing how we are similar is important. Just something to think about and possibly pass along to the website design team. Feel free to contact me for any volunteer work.
  • commented 2016-08-06 08:32:30 -0500
  • commented 2016-08-05 19:59:41 -0500
    Why don’t you have a several pages documenting the history of the Libertarian party in Texas and all those who ran for office in Texas as Libertarians back to the beginning in 71?
  • commented 2016-08-04 12:11:52 -0500
    I am interested in any events and getting involved in Houston prior to the elections in November.
  • commented 2016-08-03 23:29:23 -0500
    I am excited that we now have a qualified candidate joining the presidential election. I could not vote for either candidate in good conscience. Please let me know what I can do to help make Gary Johnson our next president.
  • commented 2016-08-03 21:59:10 -0500
    Is there an office or contact person in Lubbock?
  • commented 2016-08-03 16:41:21 -0500
    I have just recently moved to the Houston area from central Illinois. Throughout this past decade I have become increasingly more concerned with politics. Having served in the military, then returned home to manage a bar on a state college campus, I have seen the extremes of both the right-leaning and the left. If there is anything I can do in my area to help out, especially with the upcoming election, please let me know.
  • commented 2016-08-01 20:06:40 -0500
  • posted about this on Facebook 2016-07-30 16:47:02 -0500
    Contact Us
  • commented 2016-07-30 16:46:26 -0500
  • commented 2016-07-29 07:09:15 -0500
  • commented 2016-07-29 00:26:09 -0500
    I see you do not have a County affiliate in Gregg County I would like to assist in helping building the party in this County. I was a Republican for 30 years but am ready to move on as I view myself as a social liberal and fiscal conservative that loves liberty and hates the authoritarian bent of the two major parties now. I have served in political office as a City Councilman(non-partisan position) for Longview from 2005-2010.
  • commented 2016-07-28 05:34:41 -0500
    A Case for the Third Party Vote


    The #1 argument I hear against voting for a third party is that it’s a “wasted vote,” that any vote against the Republicans is a vote for the Democrats, and vice versa. We feel that if we don’t vote for the “lesser of two evils” then we run the risk that the “greater of two evils” might win the election. Those statements would be true if our election process was based exclusively on the popular vote. But it’s not. Our founding fathers didn’t trust the general population to responsibly elect a president, so they established the electoral college.


    By present count, 34 of the 50 states, representing approximately 63.5% of the population, are categorically “red” or “blue” states. This means that all the electors from these states will vote Republican or Democrat, respectively. One would have to move mountains to change the electoral votes in those states. Thus, when we go to the polls in November and cast our vote for president, our votes don’t matter for much if we’re voting for one of the two major parties. Our electors are already lined up in one camp or the other, and they vote their conscience. They don’t have to change their votes based on how we vote. That’s how presidents can lose the popular vote and still win the election. While this setup can make us feel rather insignificant in the political process, it also gives us the unique privilege of being able to vote for whoever we want – even for a third party candidate – without running the risk that “greater of two evils” will win the election.


    By living in a “solid” state, we can vote without fear that we will negatively affect the election…whatever “negatively” means to you. Voting for a third (or even fourth) party is a way to give the proverbial finger to both the electoral college and the two-party system at once. By voting for a third party in large numbers, we send a message to the two larger parties that we’re tired of business as usual; that we reject their fear mongering antics; that we do not approve of either of their candidates; that the candidates themselves must earn our votes on their own merit, not just because he or she isn’t the other guy.


    Historically speaking, there is power in the third party vote. The Socialist Party ran a presidential candidate in every campaign between 1900 and 1916, winning anywhere from 0.62% to 5.99% of the popular vote. They never won a single electoral vote, but by 1932, the vast majority of their platform had been adopted by the Democrats – including issues like ending child labor, guaranteeing overtime pay, safety inspections in the workplace, and an end to monopolies and trusts. Another example is the Prohibition Party, which won 1.19% to 1.92% of the popular vote over the same period. By 1919, the Republicans had adopted their platform and passed the Eighteenth Amendment, prohibiting the production, transport, and sale of alcohol. While these issues may or may not have stood the test of time, the point is that voting for a third party in greater numbers demands attention from the two main parties in the long run.


    Over the last century, we’ve been conditioned to think that voting for a third party is foolish, dangerous, or both. Not so. If you live in a solid red or solid blue state, the likelihood that your third party vote has any effect on the electoral vote is next to nil. The factor that will have a greater impact on electoral outcomes over the next few voting cycles is the demographic make-up of your state.


    I’ve heard so many people say that they’re displeased with both candidates that we’ve been presented with — and not just in the usual, “I’m not a big fan of either of them” way, but rather in an “I’m truly disgusted with both of them” way. They’re both counting on the fact that we’ll vote for someone we find repulsive out of fear that the other guy might win. When you live in a solid state and remove fear from the equation, you can communicate to both parties who you really want to vote for, who actually reflects your values. That’s how you refine future Democratic and Republican candidates to be a reflection of the people they claim to represent. If you don’t take this opportunity, then what motivation do the main parties have to change their approach? How else will they know that you don’t approve of their antics? And later down the line, when state demographics do make your state likely to become a swing state, the big parties will know what you stand for and that they have to adopt some of those third party platform items if they want to keep or win your state. This is a communication process, and we must take advantage of this opportunity to communicate. All they hear is votes.


    http://www.270towin.com/
  • commented 2016-07-27 21:26:57 -0500
    I do not believe that Nolan COunty is organized. Yes it is a small county, but it is where I live. I would love to see an LP organization effort here. I will help out by being a precinct chair. I’m a school teacher, so I am not sure I can be a good county chair for an upstart party. I’m hoping to get into contact with a party official to see what can be done here in Nolan County.
  • commented 2016-07-26 16:56:36 -0500
    I am voting Libertarian for President and Vice-President, and will consider others down-ballot as we get closer to the general election. I would like a bumper sticker if available. I will make a contribution. (Yesterday or day before, I left a feedback [non-public] and thanks for the reply. This time going public.)
  • commented 2016-07-22 14:19:43 -0500
    Need information about a Dallas County location. Willing to hand write letters to registered voters in Dallas County to promote Johnson Weld. Also need yard signs and bumper stickers and will go door to door.
  • commented 2016-07-22 06:12:14 -0500
    I want to get involved!!
  • followed this page 2016-07-20 15:58:59 -0500
  • commented 2016-07-19 18:00:13 -0500
  • followed this page 2016-07-19 15:05:17 -0500
  • commented 2016-07-18 18:55:29 -0500
    How can I help in North Texas
  • commented 2016-07-18 07:51:52 -0500
  • commented 2016-07-11 13:44:44 -0500
    My name is Steven Childs I live in Bowie County, Texas.

    There is no Libertarian Party prescence here. I want to fill that void. How do I do this?